PERSPECTIVES - Woodbury - South Maplewood

Tue
17
Jun

50th reunion brings back memories of war, music, social change


The 17 students from the Barrett High School class of1964 and student advisor Chuck Nicholi, center back, could not imagine all the changes that would take place in the 50 years after graduation.

Left, Connie Hanson, Kathy Ehlers (deceased), Christi Sumstead, and Vonny Rohloff, 1964 Barrett High School graduates, played in the clarinet quartet 50 years ago.

Three gals from the Barrett High School class of 1964 relax with their dads (all deceased) after baccalaureate. Left, Gerald and Connie Hanson, Chester and Marilyn Anderson and Edwin and Vonny Rohloff.

Taking a selfie in 1964 in a photo booth are from left: Connie Hanson, Vonny Rohloff and Marilyn Anderson.

The Barrett High School class of 1964 homecoming candidates were left, Connie Hanson, Vonny Rohloff, Marilyn Anderson and Christy Sumstad. Christy was crowned the queen.

Long time friends and classmates Connie Hanson and Vonny Rohloff enjoy their casual summer after high school graduation in 1964.

In September 1963, 17 enthusiastic students began their final year of high school in Barrett, Minnesota, with one goal in mind: to graduate.

Tue
03
Jun

Love at first sight


Roseville residents Neil and Marion Skildum have been married for 71 years. Last year, at their 70th anniversary party, none of the guests could find a card that went that high, the Skildums’ daughter Jan Hanson said. (Johanna Holub/Review)

Neil and Marion Skildum wed on May 27, 1943. Marion recalls borrowing the dress from a friend who had recently gotten married. “I got a tiny spot on it and it cost two dollars to clean it,” she said. “That was a lot of money at the time.” (submitted photo)

Roseville couple celebrates 71st wedding anniversary
Marion Vesaas and Neil Skildum went on a double date more than 70 years ago. It was the first time they had met, and love was in the air. The problem was, however, they were on that date with different people.

Tue
27
May

Toy Story


Barbie and friends, and their vintage Dreamhouse, adorn the 1960s living room. (photo by Linda Baumeister/Review)

Building blocks and Cootie are on display in the Minnesota History Center's newest exhibit -- Toys of the '50s, '60s and '70s. And who could forget the wisdom of Mister (Fred) Rogers in looking back on toys and play of the past?

The national traveling Toys of the '50's, 60s and '70s exhibition takes a trip down memory lane with a collection of 4,700 toys and dolls, including Tonka trucks.

The toy exhibit at the Minnesota History Center covers three decades and captures the sheer joy of imaginative play.

Jessica Kohen and Ian Lilligren look over a corner of the unfolding exhibit, which includes three living rooms and one garage setting. Viewmaster, Flintstones, Rock 'Em Sock 'Em Robots, and board games are included, as well as televisions in the living rooms playing commercials from each era.

All kinds of wheels, from a banana-seat bike, Big Wheel tricycle and skateboard are displayed near the white picket fence and garage toys. A photo backdrop shows the creativity of what to do with the leftover appliance box.

Minnesota History Center offers a ‘trip down memory lane’
Play Doh. Hot Wheels. And Barbie. Sound familiar? Those toys and a whole lot more are featured in a fascinating interactive exhibit called “Toys of the ‘50s, ‘60s and ‘70s” that may take you back to your carefree days as a child; back when you needed a break from the day-to-day worries about bullies, the opposite sex and overdue homework.

Thu
22
May

Whip up some tasty ways to 'Eat & Explore'


Dakota Day Wild Rice Salad is easy to make and very tasty. Cubed cooked chicken could be added to make it a main-course salad. (Yul Yost/Photo contributor)

Christy Campbell, author of “Eat & Explore Minnesota” (Submitted photo)

Book offers a smorgasbord of tastes, places and events
“Eat & Explore Minnesota”: is it a book on recipes? a book on travel? or a book on geography and history? After paging through its 272 pages, I decided it is all of the above and maybe even more.

Wed
07
May

Oakdale woman, daughter survive cancer during pregnancy


Amy Hejny enjoys a happy moment with her “miracle baby”, Tilia. (Linda Baumeister/Review)

Amy Hejny, diagnosed with cancer while pregnant, has battled through chemo treatments. Amy and Justin’s daughter was born six weeks early, also with a fighting spirit. A benefit to help ease financial strain is planned for May 17 at the American Legion Post 39. (Linda Baumeister/Review)

Benefit planned to allay medical costs
They call them warriors, the people with cancer. They are men and women who battle their own bodies and often undergo terrifying surgeries and difficult treatments in the fight to stay alive.
Amy Hejny, 33, is a breast cancer warrior, but she didn’t fight her battle alone.

Fri
25
Apr

From global events to local treasures, history has a home in Kansas City


The Kansas City National World War I Museum is housed in the Liberty Memorial.

Grenades and “fighting knives” attest to the bitter fighting of World War I, where soldiers in tunnels or trenches might be blown up, gassed, buried alive or encounter the enemy with barely room to draw a blade in defense.

Dave Hawley sits beside a stanchion from the “Arabia” -- a ship he discovered buried beneath a cornfield.  

This is what the ill-fated “Arabia” would have looked like under full steam as she carried passengers and supplies toward the frontier. 

Keys and all sorts of tools were found in the once-buried Arabia steamship.

Shoes of various kinds appear to have been bound for general stors farther west. As well as personal goods, the “Arabia” was loaded to the decks with “dry goods” to stock stores for the coming season of families traveling to the frontier.

Stockings, someone’s cloak and hat and bolts of material were preserved by nearly 150 years below ground. The reason there were no human fatalities; the “Arabia” sunk while most were on land eating supper, and the rest were able to scramble to shore.

President Harry Truman’s home is in Independence, Mo., just outside Kansas City. The unassuming Midwesterner, who famously “lost” to Thomas Dewey in every poll except the actual Presidential election, returned to his Missouri roots as soon as he could. 

When co-workers asked me why I was going to Kansas City -- as if it were merely flyover country -- I said there is much to see and I’d tell them after my trip. While some seemed skeptical, one piped up that the World War l museum was the best military museum he’d ever seen.

Wed
23
Apr

Rusty the snowman?


North St. Paul’s 44-foot tall snowman welcomes residents and visitors alike with a smile that stretches 16 feet across its cheerful face. (Kaylin Creason/Review)

The tradition continues. The stucco snowman celebrates the annual Snow Frolics in 2004 with the people of North St. Paul, continuing the tradition of giant snowmen at the festival that began with snow-made structures in the 1950s. (file photo)

It’s hard to find a jersey in that size! The snowman “wears” Bret Hedican’s Carolina Hurricane’s jersey to celebrate “Bret Hedican Day” in 2006 after the North St. Paul native’s Stanley Cup victory. (file photo)

North St. Paul native, two-time Olympian and Stanley Cup victor Bret Hedican and his wife, Olympic gold medalist Kristi Yamaguchi, drive past the snowman during a parade celebrating Hedican’s 2006 Stanley Cup win with the Carolina Hurricanes. (file photo)

Mayor Mike Kuehn is leading the charge to check up on the health of the 40-year-old snowman, which he fears is in danger of toppling over due to rust on its cement base. (Linda Baumeister/Review)

Does the North St. Paul snowman need a check-up? Mayor Mike Kuehn thinks so. A few months ago, Kuehn asked the North St. Paul Parks and Recreation Commission to look into the “health” of the North St. Paul snowman, which he fears is in danger of toppling over.

Wed
09
Apr

Oakdale woman takes a spin on the ‘Wheel of Fortune’


Jessica Kiefer of Oakdale, right and her friend Kristin Wasil from Michigan were contestants on the March 26 episode of “Wheel of Fortune.” The show’s theme was “Girlfriend Getaways,” and the two took home just over $10,000 in winnings. (submitted photos)

The Wheel of Fortune set was decorated in a Southwest theme during “Girlfriend Getaways” week.

Local teacher appeared during ‘Girlfriend Getaways’ week
An Oakdale woman recently appeared on “Wheel of Fortune,” the 31-year-old game show based on the popular game “Hangman,” in which contestants buy letters to solve word puzzles to win cash and fun prizes.

Mon
07
Apr

Spare Key opens doors for parents of sick kids


The striking Aria venue in downtown Minneapolis hosted the 2014 Groove Gala, Spare Key’s biggest fundraiser of the year. (Submitted photo)

The small, but passionate staff of Spare Key are committed to helping families “bounce and not break.” From left to right: Nikki Lignell (program director) Erich Mische (executive director) and Jen Holubar (director of communications, partnerships and development). Not pictured: Roerick Sweeney, director of cryptocurrency development, markets and social engagement.

Spare Key’s dedicated board of directors includes a diverse range of doctors, real estate agents, bankers, politicians and more. “There’s a commitment and passion that they each bring to the table,” Executive Director Erich Mische said. All of the board members attended the 2014 Groove Gala.

Patsy and Robb Keech with their young son, Derian. Derian was born in 1993 with a severe genetic disorder. He passed away when he was two and a half years old

Supporters of Spare Key dance the night away at the organization’s annual Groove Gala. Over 600 people attended the event, which raised over $400,000.

“Get down tonight!” Disco dance band Boogie Wonderland “groove” with Spare Key’s supporters at the non-profit’s annual Groove Gala.

South St. Paul couple’s nonprofit helps families keep their homes during crisis
If you were forced to make a decision between your job and your child, what would you do?

Tue
01
Apr

Dayton appoints Roseville lawyer to Minnesota Court of Appeals


Peter Reyes, Jr. will start his judgeship on the Minnesota Court of Appeals next week. Reyes will be the first Latino to serve on any appellate court in Minnesota. (submitted photo)

Peter M. Reyes, Jr. speaks at the MHBA Presidential Fiesta in 2012; a highlight was celebrating his becoming the first Minnesota member to become president of the Hispanic National Bar Association. (submitted photo)

Reyes had the opportunity to meet President Barack Obama in 2012. (submitted photo)

Peter Reyes will be the first Latino to serve on the court
Gov. Mark Dayton announced the appointment of Peter Reyes, Jr. as a judge on the Minnesota Court of Appeals last month. Reyes, along with District Court Judge Denise Reilly of Long Lake, Minn., were appointed to fill two at-large seats on the court following the retirement of the Honorable Thomas Kalitowski and the Honorable Terri Stoneburner on April 1.

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