News

Sun
06
Mar

Business and economic leaders discuss economic development along the Rush Line Corridor

In continuing research into the Rush Line and its effect on east metro communities, the Rush Line Pre-Project Development study held a developer roundtable discussion recently to evaluate how businesses expect development to evolve along the Rush

Sun
06
Mar

Program working within Karen community to educate about tobacco use

“Living back in the camps, we didn’t have a lot to do. People were not employed; you can’t really get a job.

Sun
06
Mar

Farnsworth students learn more than just engineering


The state competition participants, the Trash Talkers, from left to right, are Daisy Vang, Bilise Kumela, Chance Vang, Louis Barrett, YuePheng Yang, Lance Lee, Mitchell Belland, Derek Johnson, Christian Agaba, Delila Yang, Emma Wolters and Natalie Barrett.

At Farnsworth Aerospace, fifth- through eighth-graders are learning that the ability to work with others peacefully is key to problem-solving.

Sun
06
Mar

393 Bates Ave. home takes final bow


Above, with demolition taking only a few hour to complete, the lot will now be developed into a surface parking lot beginning this spring. Below, the 393 Bates Ave. home was built in 1929 and was the last house on the block, which is now being developed by Metro State University for additional parking. (submitted photo)

The 1929 adobe home at 393 Bates Ave. was finally demolished the morning of Feb. 24. 

Within a couple of hours, all that remained was a muddy hole and a pile of trees, with debris from the home already hauled away.

Wed
02
Mar

Keeping girls around the world in school


A group of volunteers met last year at the Maple Grove Government Center to cut, sew and put together colorful feminine hygiene kits for girls in Third World countries to help them manage their periods. (submitted photo)

North Hts. Lutheran joins global effort 

In American stores, girls and women may find an entire aisle of feminine hygiene products for managing their menstrual cycles so they can continue going to school, working or doing sports. They wouldn’t accept anything less.

But in remote areas of developing world, girls are often shunned, forced to miss school when they are menstruating. 

Sometimes they skip food and water, because they have to sit apart from others on cardboard or moss for a few days or they may use leaves, corn husks, mattress stuffing, newspapers or cow dung to manage their periods. They often get vaginal infections. 

Wed
02
Mar

Minnesota’s first sign of spring


Cattail mosquitoes prefer deep wetlands where cattails float on vegetative mats. (Linda Baumeister/Review)

Mosquito treatment began before the ice had melted

With all the recent news of the Zika virus, mosquitoes have unexpectedly become feared insects in the depths of winter.

Wed
02
Mar

Jessup is aiming for rematch with Yarusso in House District 42A race


Barb Yarusso

Candidates have been jumping in the House and Senate races for the Bulletin area, but House District 42A has remained relatively quiet on that front until now. 

Wed
02
Mar

Mounds View looks at renaming County Highway 10


Just before reaching Mounds View, both County Highway 10 and U.S. Highway 10 appear together on signage along Interstate 35W. (Jesse Poole/Bulletin)

Rice Creek Commons’ development could assist in name change

Attempting to change the name of County Highway 10 is nothing new for the city of Mounds View. It’s been an ongoing topic since the early 2000s. 

At points, the undertaking has seen progress, solutions and agreements with other cities. However, an equal amount of setbacks and delays have been a part of the story as well. That’s why the busy thoroughfare is still called County Highway 10, according to Mounds View City Council member Gary Meehlhause. 

Wed
02
Mar

Some Oakdale residents remain opposed new bus rapid transit

Homeowners skeptical of benefits of proposed Gold Line

Wed
02
Mar

Lake Elmo City Council may close one fire hall


Lake Elmo is considering going from two fire halls to one. Station No. 1, located on Laverne Avenue, is pictured near the downtown Lake Elmo area. (Linda Baumeister/Review)

Fire department is struggling to fill its ranks

Despite a growing population, Lake Elmo city officials say a wise move might be to downsize to one fire station and change the suburb’s firefighting staffing model. 

The city council members plan to discuss the possibility of shuttering one of the community’s two aging fire halls at their next meeting on Wednesday, March 2. 

About four years ago, the city council was considering replacing an outdated fire engine, and before making that decision city staff began researching other volunteer fire departments in similar-sized suburbs. They eventually did replace the fire engine, but their research led them to an unexpected realization.

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