Denny Lynard

Mon
28
Jul

Painted ponies go up and down


Catch up on the remarkable story of how Nancy Peterson and Peter Boehm kept the carousel in one piece and in St. Paul at ourcarousel.org, then come and meet them at the carousel’s 100th birthday party Aug. 9 at Como Park. Below, Carousel horses are either “standers” or “jumpers. At Cafesjian’s Carousel in Como Park, all 68 horses are “jumpers” meaning they move up and down. (photos by Linda E. Andersen/Review)

Volunteer crafts people painstakingly scraped off layers of dark paint - and repainted the original colors - on those spots on the horses where children’s boots and buckles had worn through the painted finishes.

Everyone is invited to the 100th birthday party for Cafesjian’s Carousel, which will be held from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 9, at the carousel’s location, right next to the Marjorie McNeeley Conservatory in Como Park. There will be birthday cake and root beer floats, while singers and face painters entertain visitors. A brief ceremony will take place at 3 p.m., and rides will be free from 4 until 6 p.m.

It’s 100 years for Como Park’s Cafesjian’s Carousel
When Nancy Peterson heard the news that cold November day in 1988 that the long-time Minnesota classic carousel had been dismantled and 20 of the horses and a chariot were now on their way to the auction block in New York City, she remembers saying to her husband, “Somebody ought to do something!” 
 

Tue
27
May

Toy Story


Barbie and friends, and their vintage Dreamhouse, adorn the 1960s living room. (photo by Linda Baumeister/Review)

Building blocks and Cootie are on display in the Minnesota History Center's newest exhibit -- Toys of the '50s, '60s and '70s. And who could forget the wisdom of Mister (Fred) Rogers in looking back on toys and play of the past?

The national traveling Toys of the '50's, 60s and '70s exhibition takes a trip down memory lane with a collection of 4,700 toys and dolls, including Tonka trucks.

The toy exhibit at the Minnesota History Center covers three decades and captures the sheer joy of imaginative play.

Jessica Kohen and Ian Lilligren look over a corner of the unfolding exhibit, which includes three living rooms and one garage setting. Viewmaster, Flintstones, Rock 'Em Sock 'Em Robots, and board games are included, as well as televisions in the living rooms playing commercials from each era.

All kinds of wheels, from a banana-seat bike, Big Wheel tricycle and skateboard are displayed near the white picket fence and garage toys. A photo backdrop shows the creativity of what to do with the leftover appliance box.

Minnesota History Center offers a ‘trip down memory lane’
Play Doh. Hot Wheels. And Barbie. Sound familiar? Those toys and a whole lot more are featured in a fascinating interactive exhibit called “Toys of the ‘50s, ‘60s and ‘70s” that may take you back to your carefree days as a child; back when you needed a break from the day-to-day worries about bullies, the opposite sex and overdue homework.

Fri
09
May

Murder charges filed against husband, wife in New Brighton shooting


Plastic deer and lawn ornaments decorated the victims' property. The victims allegedly had a deer feeder in their yard, and the animals passed through Zumberge's backyard from a wooded area near the Rice Creek Trail walking path.

Neal Curtis Zumberge; Paula Anne Zumberge

The home on the 2500 block of Knollwood Drive near Eastman Drive in New Brighton was the scene of a shooting on May 5 that killed one man and injured a woman. The victims were allegedly embroiled in a dispute with their neighbor across the street, Neal Zumberge, 57, about feeding wild deer that would occasionally cross his backyard to reach a feeder in the victims' yard.

From outside the house, gunshot holes can be seen in the aluminum front storm door and siding. Shattered glass covers the front step, and lights leading up the sidewalk to the door were strewn about near the area where police found Todd Stevens, 46. Interior photos reveal myriad bullet holes.

On Wednesday, May 7, the Ramsey County attorney's office charged Neal Zumberge with one count of second-degree murder, which has a maximum sentence of 40 years, and one count of second-degree attempted murder, which has a maximum sentence of 20 years. His wife, Paula Zumberge, 50, was charged the next day with aiding and abetting those crimes, and faces the same sentencing guidelines.
In a statement, Ramsey County Attorney John Choi called the shooting "senseless and tragic," adding that the investigation is currently ongoing.

Tue
25
Feb

Preventing theft from vehicles

The recent rash of auto break-ins in the Review and Bulletin coverage area prompts the need to re-issue standard, law enforcement reminders: a variety of bad guys want your stuff - ID thieves, addicts, or just run of the mill prowlers.
Mike Salter of the Ramsey County Sheriff’s Department, repeats their proven advice: “Hide it, close it, lock it and light it.”
Hide valuables in your trunk before arriving at your destination, or better yet, take them with you.

Tue
17
Dec

A bus named TCAAP?

The Metropolitan Council announced recently that it would evaluate a future extension of the A Line (Snelling Avenue) Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) from Rosedale Center north to the Twin Cities Army Ammunition Plant (TCAAP) property in Arden Hills.

Tue
12
Nov

A fun event’s on tap this week at Silverwood Park


Last year’s event was a brow-furrowing, roll-up-your sleeves workshop. This year, organizers have added fun as an ingredient and re-designed the event as a kid-friendly festival. (submitted phtoto)

An event homeowners, apartment renters - even kids - may want to check out is scheduled for the late afternoon and early evening of Thursday, Nov. 14 at Silverwood Park in St. Anthony.
The effort is co-sponsored by Falcon Heights and Lauderdale as well as St. Anthony and is subtitled “Action for Sustainable Cities.”It’s part of a movement that is growing not only locally, but also nationally, even internationally, that’s known as sustainability.

Mon
11
Nov

Murder at the Museum - or Who killed Agatha Marple?


Artifacts have been missing and the body of Agatha Marple, head curator, is discovered at the museum, now a carefully crafted crime scene mystery. Attendees often took photos of themselves near the police tape body outline. (photos by Linda Baumeister/Review)

Lizabeth Doherty and Kelcey Kryzer get into CSI costume for the photo booth before getting into sleuth mode to solve the crime during a social science event.

As well as becoming crime scene investigators, the visitors, including Chase Robeck, also had the chance to access the museum’s other exhibits at a leisurely pace.

A crowd gathers at one of six evidence activity stations set up throughout the Science Museum for Murder at the Museum Oct. 3.

Denny and Annie Lynard venture out to the Science Museum of Minnesota to cover the social science Murder at the Museum Oct. 3.

Some days its best to take a break from the perplexity of the unsolved tales of murdered or missing wives and girlfriends in our metro area and go try to solve a pretend one instead. So I invited my younger daughter for an evening out to crack a murder mystery at the Science Museum of Minnesota in downtown St. Paul.

Tue
29
Oct

Countryside restaurant owner says, “Thanks for the memories”


The Countryside’s future is uncertain. The 57-year-old restaurant on County Road C-2 and Snelling Avenue in Roseville is up for sale. (photos by Linda E. Andersen/Review )

Right, Jim DuRose and his daughter Jessica Shimek: ready for another 14-hour day.

Jim DuRose became a Roseville resident when he was just a lad of eight, following his family’s move from St. Paul. He began his career at the Countryside as a dishwasher and bus boy while attending Mounds View High School, graduating from MVHS in 1976.

Wed
23
Oct

Urban farming, a growing trend, has people in some communities worked up

To address a controversy that seems to be growing in New Brighton, the city council recently established an urban farming task force, charged with making recommendations to the council on all things grown on a farm, from apples to zucchini, from pigs to butterflies.
But chickens seem to be at the core of the issue, and that will likely be the focus of the group.

Wed
11
Sep

The day everything changed


Folks gathered round the radio to hear first-hand accounts of the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, -- the day everything changed. (photo courtesy of the Ramsey County Library system)

Minnesotans rushed to enlist in the service following the devastating attack on the “day that will live in infamy,” Dec. 7, 1941. (photo courtesy of the Ramsey County Library system)

Ramsey County libraries are taking a new look at World War II
When Judy Woodward, history coordinator for the Ramsey County Library system, began to look for opportunities for post-summer programs, she says she again thought about World War II and how veterans’ experiences need to be shared.
U.S. veterans of the 1941-45 war are dying at the rate of more than 600 a day, according to the Veteran’s Administration.

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