North St. Paul plans for construction season


North St. Paul streets that will be improved in the upcoming construction season include: Belmont Lane between Eldridge Avenue East to Henry Street; Betty Jane Court; Burke Avenue east of Margaret Street; Charles Street North between South Avenue East and Belmont Lane; Eldridge Avenue East between Margaret Street and Park Row; Henry Street between Eldridge Avenue East and Parkway Drive; Park Row between South Avenue East and Parkway Drive, and Parkway Drive between Belmont Lane and Holloway Avenue.

Streets in the city’s southeast corner will be improved over the summer

The rumbling of dump trucks and road pavers will be familiar sounds for residents of the southeast corner of North St. Paul this summer.

On Jan. 17, the city council approved the town’s 2017 mill and overlay street project after a public hearing. 

The project area includes all of the roads between South and Holloway Avenues from Margaret Street to Division Street (Highway 120). 

Some of these roads will see a pavement reclamation, while others will see only mill and overlay work. A pavement reclamation involves removing the entire layer of existing pavement and replacing it with new asphalt. Mill and overlay is the process of removing only the top layer of pavement and replacing it with new asphalt.

For this project, damaged or settled curbs will also be replaced and repairs will be made as needed to the storm sewers, sanitary sewers and sanitary manholes.

Pavement reclamation will be done to: Burke Avenue east of Margaret Street; Eldridge Avenue East between Margaret Street and Belmont Lane; Betty Jane Court; Parkway Drive between Belmont Lane and Holloway Avenue, and Park Row between Eldridge Avenue and Parkway Drive.

Mill and overlay work will be done to: Belmont Lane between Eldridge Avenue East to Henry Street; Charles Street North between South Avenue East and Belmont Lane; Eldridge Avenue East between Charles Street North and Park Row; Henry Street between Eldridge Avenue East and Parkway Drive, and Park Row between South Avenue and Eldridge Avenue.

“All of these streets are in generally good or fair condition, but they are all falling within a category in terms of our ongoing rating evaluation process for streets — street infrastructure within the city — as being ready for an interim improvement such as a mill and overlay or reclamation to be able to delay a more expensive reconstruction at some point in the future,” said city engineer Morgan Dawley.

Residents will be able to drive on the affected roads throughout the process and will be able to coordinate with city staff to limit any potential scheduling conflicts such as graduation parties or home renovation projects.

Construction on the project, which has an estimated $1,485,600 total cost, is expected to run from May to September and will be funded with a combination of city funds and special assessments to property owners along the streets.

During the public hearing, residents’ concerns seemed to focus on the burden of paying their assessments within the 30-day no-interest window and the storm water runoff issues on Betty Jane Court.

Property owners who live along the affected roads are being assessed at a rate of $20.50 per foot for single-family residences on mill and overlay roads and $35 per foot for single-family residences  on reclamation roads. According to Dawley, the average single-family mill and overlay assessment is $1,864 and the average reclamation assessment is $2,780.

Residents who are assessed have until Feb. 16, 2017, to pay their assessment before they are charged interest at a rate of 3.86 percent per year. At the meeting, city staff and council members noted many options for managing the payments including a deferment option.

In response to existing storm water runoff issues on Betty Jane Court, Dawley explained that the scope of the project does not include completely reconstructing or completely regrading the road, but with some curb replacement and evening out sunken areas of pavement he said he felt confident that significant improvements could be made.

“The goal is to do exactly what you’re looking for, which is improve the drainage out there,” Dawley told a homeowner on Betty Jane Court, although he added that it’s difficult for an engineer to predict that the issue will be 100 percent fixable.

“It’s not free, but I think it will be a nice improvement in your neighborhood,” Mayor Mike Kuehn said to the homeowners in the southeast section of the city.

 

Aundrea Kinney can be reached at 651-748-7822 or akinney@lillienews.com.

 

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