Q & A with Roseville Area School Board candidates

Candidates will face off Nov. 5

Alex Holmquist
news editor

Polling places will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Nov. 5. Find your polling place at www.co.ramsey.mn.us/elections/ or contact Ramsey County Elections at 651-266-2171.


Frank Shaw

Frank Shaw

Frank Shaw, 59, is married to Ruth and has three children ages 24, 25 and 19. All three attended Brimhall Elementary School, and two attended Roseville Area Middle School and Roseville Area High School, graduating from RAHS in 2002 and 2006. Shaw previously served on the school board from 2006 to 2009. He teaches mathematics and is the director of the Quantitative Reasoning Center at Hamline University. He earned his PhD in mathematics    from the University of California, Riverside.

Q & A with Frank Shaw

Q: After speaking with community members on your campaign trail, what do you feel are the most important issues facing School District 623?

A: Everyone acknowledges the problem of the achievement gap and the strains that changing demographics have put on the system. Our achievement gap is unconscionably large. The state of Minnesota, bargaining with the federal government over an waiver on NCLB, has promised to cut the achievement gap in half in five years. At the rate we’re going, this won’t be possible.

I’ve also heard from people about how we need to pay more attention to the child in the middle. Neither classified as gifted nor identified with special needs, these students are in fact responsible for our excellent reputation.

Q: What programs or services in the district would you like to see enhanced, introduced or eliminated?

A: We over-test our children. The twice a year MAP testing program was useful when it was introduced about a decade ago, but growth measures are now provided by the MCA tests that the state requires our children to take annually. The data that these tests provide promise much (in terms of targeted instruction and problem identification) but deliver little.

There are many excellent programs that could be enhanced, including, to name a few, early childhood education programs, summer programs, arts education in general, physical education and technical and vocational education programs.


Mike Boguszewski

Mike Boguszewski

Mike Boguszewski, 56, is married to Debbie and has two children, ages 22 and 16, who attend the Perpich Center for Arts. He is the director of strategy and growth for Park Nicollet Health Services. Boguszewski also serves on the Roseville Planning Commission and the Roseville Variance Board, the School District 632 Involvement and Communication Advisory Council, and the Make-A-Wish Foundation of Minnesota long-range planning and program committees. He earned his MBA in management, finance and marketing from Northwestern University, Kellogg Graduate School of Management in Evanston, Ill.

Q & A with Mike Boguszewski

Q: After speaking with community members on your campaign trail, what do you feel are the most important issues facing School District 623?

A: At the fundamental level, parents, families and community members want to have confidence that our schools are competitive in providing a top-tier education to our children, and preparing them to succeed in an ever more global world. They also want to know that their concerns are listened to by district administration, and that the board will welcome their input. They are hoping for innovation around the thornier issues: threatened funding; class size; proper balance among academics, sports and the arts; applying resources wisely and fairly that ensures equal opportunity for achievement to all communities among our increasingly diverse students.

Q: What programs or services in the district would you like to see enhanced, introduced or eliminated?

A: Even with passage of the funding levy, we will need to focus scarcer dollars where most effective: directly within the classroom – teachers, and resources/ideas that optimize contact-time; and in programs that support and incent greater parent/family engagement in the learning lives of their children. We can explore greater collaboration with business partners; and take fuller advantage of outreach opportunities offered by potential affiliate organizations, (for example, MN Humanities Center, Perpich arts high school, etc.), to broaden/deepen what our district offers kids, in a way that maximizes value, and enhances our success as a competitive “destination district.”


Mark Traynor

Mark Traynor

Mark Traynor, 46, is married to Jennifer Peterson and has two children, ages 13 and 16, who attend Roseville Area Middle School and Roseville Area High School. He is the Sr. Vice President and General Counsel for UCare. He earned his Juris Doctor from the University of Minnesota Law School and his master’s degree in public affairs from the Humphrey Institute of public affairs.

Q & A with Mark Traynor

Q: After speaking with community members on your campaign trail, what do you feel are the most important issues facing School District 623?

A: After knocking on hundreds of doors, I have been struck by the positive feelings – from families and longtime residents – about Roseville Area Schools. In a time of great political division, our community’s shared commitment to our schools and students is refreshing. Still, to keep our schools strong, we must ensure:   

• All  students are challenged to achieve and reach their potential.

• Our schools have sufficient resources to fulfill their mission, but  responsibly use funds to focus on student achievement.   

• The  board provides meaningful opportunities for parents and other community members to understand and provide input in developing  policy.

Q: What programs or services in the district would you like to see enhanced, introduced or eliminated?

A: My approach to evaluate current or new programs involves: (1) obtaining data and community input about the program; (2) examining whether the program provides value to help our students achieve while weighing its costs, available resources, and potential alternatives; and (3) adopting or continuing those programs that cost-effectively advance student achievement, and revising or eliminating those that do not. I support enhancement and introduction of effective learning technology in our classrooms as an important tool in a teacher’s toolbox. Such technology needs to be aligned with the curriculum and used by teachers who are trained to leverage its power.


Kitty Gogins

Kitty Gogins

Incumbent Kitty Gogins, 55, is married to Mark and has two children who attended Emmet D. Williams Elementary School, Roseville Area Middle School and Roseville Area High School. Her son graduated in 2005 and her daughter graduated 2009. She has served on the Roseville School Board for eight years and is self-employed as a business consultant in strategic planning and program management. She earned her bachelor’s degree in food science from the University of Minnesota.

Q & A with  Kitty Gogins

Q: After speaking with community members on your campaign trail, what do you feel are the most important issues facing School District 623?

A: I have had the opportunity to talk to close to a thousand community members over the last couple of months. The vast majority of folks I have spoken with believe Roseville Area Schools provide a strong educational foundation for our youth. The most common concern I have heard is the need to further increase rigor and achievement, while ensuring our tax payer dollars are spent wisely. The community would like to see each of our children reach their full potential.

Q: What programs and services in the district would you like to see implemented or enhanced?

A: I would like to see expansion of programs proven to strengthen achievement. Programs that build a respectful, equitable learning environment; offer classes and learning opportunities at levels appropriate for each student; provide individualized, personally relevant instruction; and remove barriers to student success. An example of a proven program is Reading Recovery, which provides intensive reading instruction for twelve weeks to first graders with the lowest reading skills and results in 80 percent of students’ reading skills rising to grade level. Another is more rigorous preparation of students for advanced classes and offering broader selection of such classes in high school.

Alex Holmquist can be reached at aholmquist@lillienews.com or 651-748-7813.

 

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